Will the Late Snow Kill My Flowers

In Fall on March 13, 2017 at 9:47 pm | Written by admin
It’s times like these you are reminded that you live in Northern Illinois.

One weekend you are enjoying sixty degree temperatures and the next you’re worried that your flowers are going to be killed by a snowstorm.

It is the joy of midwest living.

The early warm weather sure was great you know you’re going to pay for it later. Once the tulips and daffodils have mature leaves and shoots, you’re excited for spring.

Then the snow comes.

How will the snow affect my flowers?

The good news is that most flowering plants are very hearty. Most of them can survive a snowstorm no problem.

The biggest danger is not actually snow but an extended cold snap after the flowers have their flowering buds.

Related: Flowers and Other Plants for Your Garden that Resist Rabbits

Tulips in the snow

Tulips can handle short cold snaps of cold and snow without much of a problem. The biggest danger to tulips is extended below freezing temperatures after the flower buds have formed.

Usually, they will survive, but when the buds are about to bloom, the flowers are at their most delicate moment. Extreme cold could harm the flower. They may cause a few browns spots on the flower or leaves.

The good news is that even if the flower is damaged, the bulbs will be fine and will come back again next year.

Daffodils in the snow

Daffodils, being one of the earliest blooming flowers, are very well adapted to cold weather.

I saw proof of this myself last year. We spent a lot of time planting bulbs in late fall and then in March we had a snowstorm as all the flowers were starting to bloom. A yard full of daffodils with snow on them.

But they survived! Daffodils my not have a real long bloom cycle but the snow did not kill them. And they all came back next year.

Hyacinths in the snow

We’ve seen freezing temperatures and snow have different results on hyacinths. Often they seem to do quite well. People have reported snow causing their hyacinths shock though, causing the flowers to wilt. Most of the time they should be okay.

Magnolias

Flowers on magnolia trees are unfortunately susceptible to snow and cold. If flower buds are already present, they will be threatened by the cold. If they are damaged, the flowers may not bloom and you will unfortunately, have to wait until next spring to see them.

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